Skip to content

It’s All About the Ladies: Using the Alamo Research Center for Women’s History

August 7, 2015

Resource Round-Up #4

One of the very important functions of an archives is to serve communities and histories that have not always been included in public discourse. We pride ourselves on the Daughters of Republic of Texas Library Collection’s content related to underrepresented groups. In particular, we house a great deal of material that illuminates women’s history and the history of women’s groups. Here’s a brief guide to some of the women you can learn more about in our collection!

Photograph, Duchess Mary Milby Giles (Beckmann), Courts of Carnival Flowers and Lilies, 1911 and 1912 Collection: Col 14629 Adolph Guenther and Milby Giles Beckmann Family Papers

Photograph, Duchess Mary Milby Giles (Beckmann), Courts of Carnival Flowers and Lilies, 1911 and 1912
Collection: Col 14629 Adolph Guenther and Milby Giles Beckmann Family Papers

Milby Giles Beckmann (1890-1956)

Mary Milby Giles was born at Vance Ranch near San Antonio on 1890 January 22. She was the daughter of famed architect Alfred Giles and Annie Laura James. An accomplished pianist, Milby was also involved in a several local organizations, including St. Mark’s Episcopal Church and the Military-Civilian Club, San Antonio Conservation Society, and King William Area Conservation Society.

Mary A. Maverick (1818-1898)

Mary Ann Adams Maverick married Texas revolutionary Samuel A. Maverick in 1836 and accompanied him to San Antonio in 1838. They had ten children, six of whom survived to adulthood. Four of her sons fought in the Civil War. Mary kept diaries of her experiences on the Texas frontier, including the Runaway of ’42 and the Council House Fight.  She was also a dedicated correspondent and political observer in the dozens of family letters contained in the Maverick Family Papers.

May Eckles Pugh (1876-1958)

After her 1934 marriage to M.H. (Martin Harold) Pugh, May Eckles moved to Donna, Texas, where she and her husband were involved in the fruit industry. She moved back to San Antonio after her husband’s death in 1945. Begun on her sixteenth birthday, her diary was maintained without significant interruption until two days before her death at age 82.

Elisabet Ney (1833-1907)

Elizabet Ney was one of the first professional sculptors in Texas. Her sculptures appear at the Texas Capitol, the United

Elizabet Ney, reknowned Texas sculptor, wearing a high collar traditional dress, undated. General Images Collection, DRT Library Collection, Alamo Research Center.

Elizabet Ney, reknowned Texas sculptor, wearing a high collar traditional dress, undated. General Images Collection, DRT Library Collection, Alamo Research Center.

States Capitol, and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Art. In addition to her sculpting, Ney took an active role in artistic and civic activities in Austin, where she died on 1907 June 29. Four years later a number of her supporters founded the Texas Fine Arts Association in her honor.

Ellen Schulz Quillin (1892-1970)

Ellen Dorothy Schulz moved to San Antonio, Texas, where she taught science at Main Avenue High School. She soon became interested in establishing a museum in San Antonio and helped organize the acquisition of a large natural history collection, which was housed in Main Avenue High School. The collection was the nucleus of the Witte Memorial Museum, which opened in 1926 with Schulz as its director, a position she held until her retirement in 1960, while continuing to pursue her interest in botany.

The Sultanas de Bejar (1948-present)

The Sultanas de Bejar is a women’s organization that was formed in San Antonio, Texas, in 1948. It serves as a social auxiliary to Bejar Caravan No. 56, the local chapter of the International Order of the Alhambra. Solely social in nature, the organization’s mission is to foster fellowship among members of Bejar Caravan No. 56 and their wives and to assist in furthering the aims and objectives of the Caravan.

There are many other collections that include information about Texas women and women’s organizations. You can try our catalog, use the subject guide on our website, or search our manuscript finding aids in TARO (Texas Archival Resources Online). We’re here to help in person from 9 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. So give us a call or send us an email to set up your research appointment today!

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: